Juneteenth features free admission at Missouri Botanical Garden

The Missouri Botanical Garden will offer free admission to all visitors on Sunday, June 19 in honor of Juneteenth. Visitors can spend a restful and restorative day in the Garden and partake in special activities planned for the day. 


Getting MO Peace

It’s been a wild eighteen months. Many shifted work and home lives around during the pandemic in an effort to keep others safe. Now as more people are vaccinated, and as case numbers decline and establishments continue to open up, we should all feel relieved, right? Not exactly, says Dr. Arpit Aggarwal of MU Health Care.


August 18, 1960

R. Buckminster Fuller designed something he called a geodesic dome and placed one in the Missouri Botanical Garden. Calling this one a "Climatron" he explained that it would last for a while but was not a permanent structure. It has been there now for over 50 years and seems able to stand for many more.  


A Tip-Top Tree for Christmas

Discover 6 tips to maintaining a fresher and greener live Christmas tree.


Friendly Flames

Prescribed burns at Shaw Nature Reserve enhance biodiversity in its ecosystems.


Whose Woods These Are

Missouri Botanical Garden’s Shaw Nature Reserve offers natural wooded habitats for nature lovers year-round. 


End of Summer Fun in St. Louis

Discover virtual art festivals, socially distanced events, rooftop karaoke, and more in St. Louis. 


Climatron, Botanical Garden, Route 66

Rediscover Community on the Mother Road

Interstate 44 crosses Missouri from St. Louis to the Oklahoma state line, just west of Joplin, a length of 293 miles. For 235 of those miles, from St. Louis to Halltown, I-44 follows the route of what John Steinbeck called America’s “Mother Road”—the legendary Route 66.


February 20, 1833

Legendary botanist, naturalist and medical doctor, George Engelmann, came to Missouri on this day. He did most of the work in establishing what is now the Missouri Botanical Garden for Henry Shaw.


The Climatron in the sunset at Missouri Botanical Gardens

April 18, 1960

R. Buckminster Fuller designed something he called a geodesic dome and placed one in the Missouri Botanical Garden. Calling this one a "Climatron" he explained that it would last for a while but was not a permanent structure. It has been there now for over 50 years and seems able to stand for many more.