July 6, 1763

Maxent, Laclede and Company of New Orleans was granted the exclusive rights to trade with American Indians in the Mississippi Valley on this day. Hence, Laclede and his stepson came upriver and established a trading post which they named St. Louis.


June 14, 1804

The Corps of Discovery was having a terrible time in western Missouri near present day Miami. The current of the river was so strong that they were running out of ways to get the boats upstream.


June 10, 1804

Lewis and Clark spent this day walking the prairies of central Missouri. They wrote of being impressed with the combination of good soil, grass, and an abundance of wild fruit near present day New Cambridge.  


May 14, 1804

The Lewis and Clark Expedition (the Voyage of Discovery) left St. Louis to explore the unknown west.  


April 30, 1803

The treaty that authorized the Louisiana Purchase was signed on this date in Paris.


April 9, 1682

Robert de La Salle took possession of this Louisiana Territory, which included modern day Missouri, for France and named the area for King Louis XIV.


March 19, 1687

The French explorer Robert de La Salle, who expeditioned in Missouri and the Mississippi Valley, was murdered on this date by mutineers.


March 9, 1804

In St. Charles and St. Louis flag raising ceremonies were conducted recognizing the new American sovereignty.


February 28, 1803

Congress set aside money on this date for a small military unit to explore the valleys of the Missouri and Columbia Rivers. Thomas Jefferson chose a childhood friend, Meriwether Lewis, to head the expedition.


December 20, 1812

Sacagawea died at Fort Manuel in South Dakota. As promised, Explorer/Governor William Clark took custody of her son, Jean Baptiste and her infant daughter Lisette and raised them in St. Louis.