June 14, 1804

The Corps of Discovery was having a terrible time in western Missouri near present day Miami. The current of the river was so strong that they were running out of ways to get the boats upstream.


June 10, 1804

Lewis and Clark spent this day walking the prairies of central Missouri. They wrote of being impressed with the combination of good soil, grass, and an abundance of wild fruit near present day New Cambridge.  


May 14, 1804

The Lewis and Clark Expedition (the Voyage of Discovery) left St. Louis to explore the unknown west.  


February 28, 1803

Congress set aside money on this date for a small military unit to explore the valleys of the Missouri and Columbia Rivers. Thomas Jefferson chose a childhood friend, Meriwether Lewis, to head the expedition.


December 20, 1812

Sacagawea died at Fort Manuel in South Dakota. As promised, Explorer/Governor William Clark took custody of her son, Jean Baptiste and her infant daughter Lisette and raised them in St. Louis.


September 20, 1806

William Clark wrote of the "great velocity" of their trip as they grew ever more eager to get home. They made 65 miles this day and found themselves near present day Washington and Marthasville. One of the men shouted when he saw a cow and they knew they were back on the edge of settled country.


June 26, 1804

Lewis and Clark had now traversed the entire breadth of the future state of Missouri. They were at the present site of Kansas City and preparing to start north along the western edge of our state.


November 28, 1803

Lewis and Clark visited the oldest permanent settlement in Missouri, Ste. Genevieve.


Meet Missouri’s First Governors

It all began  with the bargain of the century. A savvy deal negotiated between France and the United States more than two hundred years ago would set the stage for the first major challenge of this young nation in the New World.


July 9, 1804

Lewis and Clark were exploring in present day Holt County.