May 14, 1804

On this date in history, the Lewis and Clark Expedition—also known as the Voyage of Discovery—sets out across Missouri to explore the lands west of the Mississippi.


United States map showing the area included in the Louisiana Purchase.

October 20, 1803

The U.S. Senate approves the Louisiana Purchase that adds more than 800,000 acres of land – including what would become Missouri – to more than double the size of the United States.


July 9, 1804

Lewis and Clark were exploring in present day Holt County.


June 26, 1804

Lewis and Clark had now traversed the entire breadth of the future state of Missouri. They were at the present site of Kansas City and preparing to start north along the western edge of our state.


June 10, 1804

Lewis and Clark spent this day walking the prairies of central Missouri. They wrote of being impressed with the combination of good soil, grass, and an abundance of wild fruit near present day New Cambridge.  


May 14, 1804

The Lewis and Clark Expedition (the Voyage of Discovery) left St. Louis to explore the unknown west.  


Meriwether Lewis

February 28, 1803

Congress set aside money on this date for a small military unit to explore the valleys of the Missouri and Columbia Rivers. Thomas Jefferson chose a childhood friend, Meriwether Lewis, to head the expedition.


Ste Genevieve Missouri

November 28, 1803

Lewis and Clark visited the oldest permanent settlement in Missouri, Ste. Genevieve.


Portraits of Lewis and Clark

November 23, 1803

Lewis and Clark were still making their way toward St. Louis when they arrived at Cape Girardeau. Lewis was the dinner guest of Louis Lorimier. Clark was not welcome. Read more about this in Tales From Missouri and the Heartland. Lewis noted that there was also a group of "duch" (German) settlers who had already erected mills and a group of about 400 Shawnee.