Chilling Auschwitz Exhibit Expands Hours

Union Station Kansas City has expanded the hours of its Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. exhibit for Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays beginning February and running through March 19, 2022. Union Station officials announced the expanded hours as a response to public demand. he exhibition features artifacts and materials—never before seen in North America—on loan from more than twenty institutions and private collections around the world.


The Tribes of Missouri Part 1: When the Osage & Missouria Reigned

Two groups with distinct cultures emerged from our region’s first residents to dominate this land. Worshipful and warlike on an untouched landscape, the Osage and the Missouria did more than live here. For centuries, they ruled.


Preserving the Disappearing Memory of Missouri’s Little Tuskegee

In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that separate-but-equal facilities like schools were unconstitutional. This led to the closure of the school perched on the hillside in Dalton. After the 1956 school year, active Dalton students attended now-integrated schools in their hometowns.
Now seemed like a great time to gather memories of Dalton Vocational School from the shrinking pool of aging alumni. This podcast tells the story of Dalton Vocational School—Missouri's "Little Tuskegee"—in the former students' own words. 


The enduring legacy of Hiram Young

The story is familiar, replicated by scores of people living and working in Missouri in the 1800s. It goes something like this: a person starts from humble beginnings, takes big risks in moving west to pursue new opportunities, starts simple and builds a trade or business, employs many people, offers essential products or services that make life possible, and in the end not only enjoys success but becomes a benefactor for the common good.
Those stories are common. What is rare is a person who was born into slavery and then did all those things, like Hiram Young.


Missouri women senators, past and present, pose for a photo in the Senate chamber.

‘You Can, Too!’ Celebrates Missouri’s Female Senators

Fifty years after Mary Gant became the first woman elected to the Missouri Senate, a record number 11 women now occupy nearly one-third of the 34 seats in the Senate chamber. That history is the fulcrum of a new book, You Can, Too! Journey to the Missouri Senate, presented by Missouri Humanities Council and published by Missouri Life Media.


Henry Blosser House and Barn photo slideshow

The Henry Blosser House and Barn near Malta Bend had been abandoned and neglected for years when new owners Dr. Art and Carolyn Elman stepped in to preserve these architectural treasures. The project, led by acclaimed interior designer Kelee Katillac, took years of painstaking effort by a team of preservation experts. The result is a masterpiece where conscientious conservation and spectacular design intersect.


An illustration of how Missouri's landscape and lives might look in the year 2221.

Imagining Missouri: The Show-Me State in 2221

Why bother with imagining the future at all? The future is a place to project our hopes, along with our doubts and uncertainties. We invite you to imagine the future as you’d most like to see it, and to think about what Missourians living in the present day can do to reach that imaginary destiny.


Memoir-in-Progress: The fish fry

The story about a New Year’s Eve spur-of-the-moment fish fry with fifty or more people showing up at our house is one of those “I remember when” trips down memory lane that might have faded road signs, considering the trip goes back an eon or two to December 31, 1974.

I remember when …


Beaver working on its dam

Shining Times: Missouri’s Fur Trade Story

Fur played a vital role in the early Anglo settlements. It was animal pelts, not tobacco, that the early Virginia colonists first exported. The North American fur trade had a tremendous impact on exploration, colonization, and international politics.


St. Joseph: More than just a stop on the Pony Express

St. Joseph is home to iconic places, including Jesse James’s home, the Pony Express birthplace, and the Kansas City Chiefs’ training camp. History flows through this town where museums tell the stories of this westward jumping-off point and where new stories are beginning.