Life on the Run: Riding With the Younger Brothers

In the stories told about them during their careers the Youngers were often cast in the classic Robin Hood mold. It was an image they worked hard to cultivate, but it was only half true. They did steal from the rich but, as biographer T.J. Stiles wrote, “There is no evidence that they did anything with their loot except spend it on themselves.”


Ste. Genevieve to Become a National Historic Park

Ste. Genevieve was established in 1735 by French-Canadian colonists. It was the first ever settlement by Europeans in Missouri.


The New Madrid Earthquakes of 1811-1812

“The earth, river, etc., torn with furious convulsions, opened in huge trenches. There through a thousand vents sulphurous streams gushed from its very bowels leaving vast and almost unfathomable caverns.”


Arrow Rock’s Hidden Black History

The National Historic Landmark Village of Arrow Rock Embraces its Diverse Past.


The Vaile Mansion is Always a Marvel

There’s no other way to describe the Vaile Mansion during the holiday season. Each year, the Victorian Society—a volunteer group dedicated to the mansion’s preservation—selects a Christmas theme and begins to deck the halls of this historic Second Empire-style home.


An Old-Time Holiday at Hermann Farm

For some, traveling for the holidays is not so much a matter of where to go as when. There’s something about Christmas that shares a symbiotic relationship with the past. Memory creates a personal nostalgia. Time slows down. And technology takes a backseat to traditions.


Divided We Stand

What happens when a county tries to secede from the state?


A Stagecoach Comes Home

This is the tale of a still-working stagecoach—now fondly named The Journey—that has operated in three different centuries—probably the only stagecoach in this country to do that—and how it is coming home to Missouri.


The Man Who Killed Quantrill

The residents of Lawrence, Kansas, would never forget what happened on August 21, 1863, if indeed they were lucky enough to survive. The reason for the bloody raid that left nearly two hundred men dead and caused between $1 million and $1.5 million in damage (in 1863 dollars) is still the subject of speculation.


Meet Missouri’s First Governors

It all began  with the bargain of the century. A savvy deal negotiated between France and the United States more than two hundred years ago would set the stage for the first major challenge of this young nation in the New World.